All posts tagged: Kobe Kanagawa Eye Clinic

LASIK Update

I never got around to posting an update on the 4th anniversary of my LASIK operation, but now that things are calming down I can post a 4 year 6 month update. Click here for a summary of my previous posts about LASIK (laser eye surgery)  Quick update: Eyes are great, still have the vision of a hawk. Longer update: The advantages of having had LASIK and not having to deal with glasses and contact lenses have been magnified by the arrival of our daughter Jasmine. Having a baby is fantastic.  It also means you have less time, less sleep, more colds, and more responsibilities. So glad I don’t have to mess around finding glasses in the middle of the night, or dealing with contact lenses and poopy diapers while half-asleep. The issue of less sleep and more colds is important.  Usually, my eyes didn’t get irritated by contact lenses, but if I was overly tired or getting sick, I would get sore red eyes, and I’d be forced to switch from contact lenses to …

10 life changes since getting LASIK

It’s been nearly 4 years since I had LASIK at the Shinjuku branch of the Kobe Kanagawa Eye Clinic Japan. You can read more about my experience with LASIK here:  http://www.travel67.com/lasik/    I was chatting with friends the other day about how positive my experience had been. Here are 10 ways my life changed! (These don’t include non-Lasik related changes such as getting married, buying a house…)  Saving money      No need to buy contact lenses, or solutions, or glasses.   Saving time        Don’t have to spend a few minutes in the morning and before going to bed dealing with contact lenses. No emergency glasses days              I’d wear contacts almost every day, but if I had sore eyes I’d have to wear glasses. I’d then have awkward conversations with friends or workmates explaining why I was wearing glasses.   No foggy glasses        No problems going from cool air-conditioned buildings to the humid outdoors.   Smaller wash kit          No extra bag of solutions, cleaning products, spare lenses, and spare glasses. Much easier for …

Lasik in Japan

This is a compilation of blog posts about my experience getting laser eye surgery in Japan. Short Version: I used glasses and contact lenses for 20 years. I decided to get Laser Eye Surgery. I chose the best technique and the best clinic I could find: iDesign iLASIK at the Kobe Kanagawa Clinic in Shinjuku, Tokyo. They have a great English speaking rep. Procedure went great. I now have excellent vision, better than 20/20. Hoorah. Kobe Kanagawa Website – http://www.kobe-kanagawa.jp/english/ Use my referral code Chris Willson 483-960 and you’ll get up to 30,000 yen off. Long Version: I got my first pair of glasses when I was about 13. At age 16, I started wearing contact lenses, and glasses became a last resort. For the next 20 years I used contact lenses pretty much everyday. I’ve journeyed around the world with a wash kit containing vials of lens cleaner, saline, spare lenses and backup glasses. In the grand scheme of things, having to wear contact lenses is a mild inconvenience rather than a burden, but I really wished …

Lasik – 6 month check-up

While in Tokyo, I’d stopped by the Kobe Kanagawa Eye Clinic in Shinjuku for my 6-month eye check after Lasik. First, I did a standard eye test. I could read the bottom line with my right eye, the second to bottom line with my left eye, and the bottom line clearly with both eyes open. My eyes were then checked by the doctor, and I was given the all clear. Awesome. I can go back to the clinic if I ever have any concerns, but that was the final regularly scheduled check-up. To learn more about my experience with Lasik  just click on the Lasik in Japan tab above.

Lasik in Japan – 1 month check

A quick follow-up post about LASIK in Japan. Last weekend I flew back up to Tokyo for my 1-month checkup at the Kobe Kanagawa Clinic in Shinjuku. As with my previous visits things went very smoothly. I filled out another questionnaire in English asking if I’d have any problems at all. I then met with an examiner who tested my vision.  I could read the bottom line of the chart with both eyes open (2.0) and when using just one eye I could make out most of the tiniest symbols. After that Dr. Takahashi checked the health of my eyes and gave me the all clear. I can now start scuba diving again. I have some drops to use if my eyes feel dry at any point, but this was my final obligatory check. Finally Ogata-san gave me a quick interview about my experience at the clinic. Richard Masuda, the international relations staff member, was there to help translate, answer any questions, and in this case take photos. I have been really pleased with the experience, …

LASIK in Japan – The 1 week check-up

Read Part One about choosing the clinic and the LASIK operation here. A week after my operation I flew up to Osaka for the 1 week check-up. I could have returned to the Shinjuku office in Tokyo, but as I could do this at any of the clinics, I thought I’d spend a couple of days in Kyoto and get my check in Umeda, Osaka. The clinic was in a central Umeda skyscraper (not far from the enormous Yodobashi Camera). I checked in and then a couple of minutes later I had my eyes tested by the examiner. With either eye open I could read the second to bottom line on the chart. With both eyes open I could just about make out all the symbols on the bottom line. Awesome. I was back in the waiting room for a couple of minutes then in to see the eye doctor. He checked the health of my eyes, confirmed that the cornea had completely sealed and asked if I was having any problems. He explained about …

Laser Eye Surgery in Japan

I got my first pair of glasses when I was about 13.  At age 16, I started wearing contact lenses, and glasses became a last resort. For the next 20 years I used contact lenses pretty much everyday. I’ve journeyed around the world with a wash kit containing vials of lens cleaner, saline, spare lenses and backup glasses. In the grand scheme of things, having to wear contact lenses is a mild inconvenience rather than a burden, but I really wished I could simply fix my eyes. Laser eye surgery, LASIK, has been around since the 90s, but the cure seemed to come with too many possible side effects. Cases of patients no longer being able to drive at night due to haloing and glare sounded a little too common to be worth risking my own vision. For me to undergo LASIK it would have to give great results with minimal risk. I’d want the latest generation of equipment, used by a team that does enough procedures for it to be routine. Over the past …